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Condominium Projects: If you Build It, They Will Sue - Shared screen with speaker view
Meetings Department
17:42
For today’s webinar, you may raise questions through the “chat” function which Jacquie and Peter will respond to either during or after the webinar. The recorded webinar will also be posted to the AIA Trust website, theaiatrust.com.Today’s participants will earn 1.5 AIA learning unit credits and you will receive an email when your credit has been uploaded to your online transcript in the next week and non-members will receive a certificate of completion.
H Istvan Walker
43:36
Can you give an example of "Communication protocol"?
Taylor French
52:57
Do you think the standard AIA Contract language is sufficient?
H Istvan Walker
53:06
Is the example of indemnity provision shown standard language in AIA contract?
Eve Reynolds
53:33
why “upfront”
ELIZABETH FRAGOSO
57:35
For Consequential Damages, the AIA contract explicitly states in excess of $500,000. Is it better for one to strike the specific value?
Ruth Lindstrom
59:15
Owner can say most cases are settled. How to respond?
Ted Halsey
01:04:11
Do enforceable indemnification provisions change state-by-state?
MONIQUE LUGO
01:05:48
are participants getting a copy of the presentation?
Eve Reynolds
01:06:16
What constitutes willful misconduct?
Alex Esposito
01:10:20
Here in CT, in order for a developer to sell units, the condo project’s architect is required by the State to ‘certify” construction. The State’s wording implies control over the project beyond standard on-site “observation”. I re-write this to read;Based upon my periodic observations of the construction at the aforementioned buildings, it is my professional opinion that the completed construction appears to substantially conform to the plans and specifications prepared by my office. This in no way implies that construction elements that I did not have access to adhere to said documents.Do you suggest any additions, or improvements, to this statement?
Michael Byrd
01:30:20
Another issue with Excess E&O approach is the appetite of the carrier to participate. Even if they would write such a policy, continuing to do this work with this approach - based on my 20 years of interacting with carriers as we do condo work - will result in the carrier declining to maintain you as a customer at anything like a competitive premium.
Taylor French
01:36:17
is there a statue of limitations on these kinds of claims?
Taylor French
01:37:23
also, what happens if a firm goes out of business or changes ownership?
Andre Coppin
01:41:02
Is there a difference between issues caused by normal wear and tear (or a building getting old) verses a construction defect?
Eve Reynolds
01:43:07
Thank you, very interesting and informative.
Ann Casso
01:43:51
Thank you Jacquie and Peter!www.theaiatrust.com